Peter Green

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A major figure in the British blues movement, Peter Green first  found fame as Eric Clapton’s replacement in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, but really came to prominence after he formed Fleetwood Mac.

Between 1968 and 1970 Green and the Mac outsold the Beatles. From the basic Chicago blues of the first eponymous album Green’s genius on the guitar was matched by the songs he wrote, indeed his writing talents made sure that the band quickly developed into something far more than a twelve bar outfit.

A talented writer and arranger, at the heart of Green’s work was an indefinable sadness and after leaving Fleetwood Mac, despite a short lived solo stint, it came as little surprise that the fragile Green seemingly rejected his fame and headed for professional obscurity.

After the spending most of  the 70s and 80s in the wilderness, Green returned to  active service in the 90s with the Peter Green Splinter Group.

An artist whose legacy is undeniable, Green’s compositions have been covered by artists such as Santana, Aerosmith, Midge Ure, Tom Petty, and Judas Priest.

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